Award Winning Best Selling Florida Author Yvonne Mason

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Dream Catcher Failure Was Never an Option!!!!

 

5.0 out of 5 stars Failure Was Never An Option,July 15, 2010
This review is from: Dream Catcher, Failure Was Never An Option (na) (Kindle Edition)

This heartfelt book follows the life history of a very special little boy and a very special family. This true story started in an era when public help was nonexistent, and persons with disabilities were not accepted. The work of the family and very supportive neighbors turn what could have been a sad story into a success story. Emotions and family love are expressed throughout this book, as many hurdles were flattened so that one life could touch so many others. This story will touch your life as you share the events that unfolded through the years. Failure was not an option and not accepted. Here we learn the value of setting a goal and aiming for that goal in spite of what others think. Caution: humor included- read sitting down.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Dream Catcher by Yvonne Mason,April 14, 2012
This review is from: Dream Catcher, Failure Was Never An Option (na) (Kindle Edition)

I read this book with great interest from an author who I admire and enjoy reading. The fact that this is a true story was a bit of a deterrent at first because I enjoy escaping into a world of imagination when I select a book, yet the subject matter was one I could not put aside and ignore.

The story, written by his sister, Yvonne Mason, is about the successful life built by a man who was born with a failure label stamped on his head by society at large..packaged, bookmarked and placed on a shelf to be regarded with little interest and/or caring by the general populace. His decision to jump into living and take the reins had been fueled and championed by his loving family..Stanley grew up believing that he was just like everyone else and could do whatever he chose and wanted to do.
His choices were many and as he sought out and found honest labor and earned all his own money to make his lifestyle possible. He succeeded throughout the years because the thought of giving up just wasn’t in his personal dictionary..failure was not an option and would never be considered.

Stan became a revered adult, loved by many friends and enjoyed the respect that he so well deserved by anyone who was lucky enough to come into his life. A great teacher of those around him, he taught others to never stop reaching for your dreams, no matter what your circumstances, real or imagined.

This book is a must read for those who entertain the idea of just giving up, which we all may do from time to time and for those who could learn a lesson from someone who was deemed mentally retarded in an age when institutionalization followed on the next breath. His strong and wise mother spit out that word and raised her son along with his father, to be someone any parents would be more than proud of and Stan never ceased to amaze his family and still does in every way~
You will be amazed as your read of his strong will and stubborn attitude to succeed and build a wonderful life~

April 17, 2012 Posted by | videos | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Intangible Gifts!

Dream Catcher Failure Was Never an Option

Years ago my family was given a gift that keeps on giving. No matter how bad it gets no matter what happens this gift keeps on giving back. This gift was given to us at a time when gifts like this was no the norm. Nor was it accepted in a closed minded and bigoted society. This gift was shunned, ignored and hidden from the world. This gift was considered a shame upon the family especially the mother. This gift was picked on, teased and often times killed because of the “difference.” There was no education for this gift no tolerance no love.

But in our home, this gift was loved, accepted, and wanted. I am talking about an amazing child who was born at a time when the handicapped were not accepted. In 1952 Stan came into our lives. He was diagnosed as Retarded after a bout of the flu leading to an inflammation of the brain which caused damage to his motor skills and speech skills among other things. The normal was “no hope” – but not in our house.

Stan not only had parents, siblings and a support group who truly loved and accepted him, he had a strength from within that can’t be taught. He believed in himself even when he was small. My life with my brother has taught me many things, but most of all it has taught me that we all have challenges, we all are retarded in some form. None of us are perfect and when we say we are we are lying to ourselves. Stan has taught me that dreams are more than just dreams, they are real and that we should never ever let them die. We should strive toward them daily. He has taught me that “everything will be alright” no matter what happens. That no matter how dark the storm clouds are there will always be a rainbow later.

Stan knows the true meaning of unconditional love even when he has been hurt. He knows the depth of loyalty. He believes that one must and should work for their paycheck for many reasons. The most important is self respect and a feeling of independence. He understands that one must work in order to live not just exist. He believes in a days work for a day’s pay. He refuses handouts from anyone and he pays his own way.

Stan is a gift to so many in many ways and for many reasons. You see he leaves a part of himself behind with whoever he meets and he stays with that person for ever. Stan is not a bigot, nor does he allow that in his life. He is not filled with self pity because he is handicapped. He doesn’t ask for anyone else to feel pity for him either. In fact it makes him angry when they do. He doesn’t ask for special attention or favors. He only asks for respect as a human who has the same feelings and emotions we all do.

He could draw a check from the government but he says, “I want to make my own money. I don’t want to live off the government.” He understands that a certain pride comes from working and making one’s own way in the world. He understands that a certain sense of well being and well roundness comes from working and getting paid for it. He understands that a sense of accomplishment comes from earning that paycheck. He understands he is not a drain on society because he contributes to society. He is worthwhile and he is somebody.

His story should be in every home, on every bookshelf in every school and in the hand of every professional from Doctors to Nurses to those who delve into the mind to teachers and aids and parents and siblings. If Stan can see all these things and he is “Retarded” then what is stopping the rest of the world from being productive?

I can only think of one thing- Selfishness. Read his story, learn how he made his dreams real when the world said he couldn’t – learn how he accepted the cards he was dealt and used them to make himself successful. Read his story and take the lessons and apply them to your life. You see we all have challenges- we all have a handicap in some shape or form. But most times we hide it from ourselves as well as the world and it becomes our crutch or excuse or so called reason for not fulfilling our dreams. Then at the end of our life we play the “shoulda, coulda, woulda” game. We die with regrets.

Stand on Graduation Day it was never supposed to happen

This was just one of his many dreams that has come true!

March 6, 2012 Posted by | Books | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Imperfect Children in a “Perfect” World

Dream Catcher Failure Was Never an Option

I have watched and listened with a couple of emotions and thoughts as the pundits and those who have no clue discuss the birth control/abortion argument yet again. The fact of whether or not “imperfect” children belong in a “perfect” world. It has begun to transcend the fact that unemployment is at an all time high, the fact that we don’t need to be in Afghanistan anymore and other important issues in our country. Be that as it may let me just tell you a story.

In my family there is an “imperfect” child. In fact there were five of us. However, the one who stands out is Stan who was born in 1952. He was born at a time when that “imperfect” child was shunned by society, much like most of them are still shunned today. Stan contracted the flu when he was six months old and to add insult to injury he got an inflammation on the lining of his brain, which left him brain damaged. The part of his brain which controls his speech and motor skills were damaged and the doctors said he would never amount to anything but a vegetable.

The doctors recommendation was an institution or asylum. You see he was to “imperfect” to be useful to society. He has no place in the “Perfect” world. He had nothing to offer, to contribute to leave as a legacy.

Fortunately my mother didn’t listen to the naysayers. She understood that he did have a place, that there is always a reason for everything in life. He has taught all of us more than we can ever teach him. He taught us unconditional love, forgiveness, tenacity, belief that dreams do come true, loyalty, faith and so many other life’s lessons that we might not have learned had it not been for the blessing in our lives.

Is there a master plan? Indeed. Do we always know what that master plan is? No we do not! Do we really live in a “Perfect” world. No we do not. None of us are perfect. We all have “imperfections”. We all have something that is wrong with us. I live in a right handed world- I am left handed. I am less than five feet tall. And no I am past the age of 30 which most people believe is the magic age of wisdom. It isn’t.

Those children whose lives are snuffed out before they even breathe a breath outside the womb are a part of our future that will never be known. Stan has helped form my future. Had it not been for me I would probably never written the first book after my creative ability was squelched as a child. I would have probably gone through my life frustrated because I felt I wasn’t good enough. I would have never known the love, the kindness and the humbleness I have learned by having him as my “imperfect” brother in this “perfect” world.

Read his story then you too will understand the depth of my feeling about the joy, need and ability these “imperfect” children offer our “perfect” world

February 26, 2012 Posted by | Books | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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